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Contact Us!

MINI-ENGINE REPAIR, INC.

Serving Perrysburg Since 1973


217 W. Third St. Perrysburg, OH

(419) 874-3139

CURRENT OFFICE HOURS: Monday-Friday 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

Saturday 9:00 AM - Noon

Closing May 5th!

Last day to drop off equipment: March 26th!

ANNOUNCEMENT!


Mini-Engine has been a proud member of the Perrysburg community for over 49 years. We have had the privilege to serve the people of NW Ohio and grow many relationships with customers across the decades. As we have mentioned in previous announcements we have been in the process of selling the business as we prepare for retirement. That process has moved forward. We apologize for any confusion or misinterpretations of our prior announcements. Unfortunately, we are not selling the business but rather the building. That means Mini-Engine itself will be closing and replaced with a business of another kind. We apologize for the inconvenience this will cause for those in need of small-engine repair work. However, we are confident that the new owners have just as much pride in this community.


In preparation for the sale of the building we will be slowly selling the rest of our stock and will cease taking repair orders as of March 26th, 2022. If you have any equipment you know you will need repaired or tuned up for the next year we highly recommend getting it into the shop as soon as possible! The business itself is set to close May 5th. We are committed to completing any orders that come to us by March 26th, however, we will remain open longer to complete any remaining orders.


If you have any interest in purchasing any of our equipment or inventory please contact us at (419) 874-3139 or email us at [email protected]. We are looking to liquidate our stock as much as possible before May 5th.


Thank you to everyone for supporting us for the past 49 years! It has been an absolute delight to be your go to shop for repair work. We have prided ourselves on providing quality repair work and a friendly customer experience in the shop. We have developed many wonderful relationships with customers over the years and look forward to running into those customers around town instead of in the shop.


Thank you again and God bless!


- Mike and Barb Smith

Expert advice from our small engine pros.

To help you keep your equipment running better and last longer, here are some important tips for everyday use and maintenance.

  • Treat gas as you would milk - don't use if thirty days old without a stabilizer.
  • Newer engines really don't like dirt. A few decades ago, people would bring mowers in with grass clippings in the gas tank, and the unit would still run! But now, a speck of dirt will sometimes keep it from running.
  • If you have a riding mower with a removable gas cap and no tether, set the cap on the seat when you're filling up. That way you can't get back on it without putting the cap back on.
  • How does dirt get in the gas tank?

             - One way is, they let the debris on the cap fall in as they take the cap on and off.

             - Your equipment's carburetor

             - Sometimes it's not your fault.. For example, Briggs once made a engine that, when they tested it, the atmospheric vent was on the side, but when it got mounted, it ended up at the front. So if you had a shady lawn, dust and debris got blown out the front. Then, as the machine went through the cloud,debris got sucked into the carb and after awhile it build-up and caused problems.

             - Also the guy at the gas station checks his tank with a long pole and then lays it on the ground, the next time he puts it in the tank the dirt goes in the tank. They are suppose to have filters but how often do they change them?

  • When running the newer two-cycles like a chain saw come off the throttle every now and then. An example would be cutting a large log. Don't try to get thru it without letting off the trigger. This will allow the saw or trimmer the ability to put lube back on the bearings because at higher speeds the bearings have a tendency to throw the lube off.
  • Be sure to use 89 Octane gas.